However, as I examined it, I realized that I could probably remove the core

That said, spending a bit of time breaking in your rope isn’t really that onerous. 5 millimetre tossa jute. Has a really, really nice smell – sort of earthy and warm. Knots are not at all difficult to unpick; because of the compactness of that tight lay, it doesn’t tend to squish and become difficult. There is another type of cotton rope I’ve seen, which I picked up at a Mitre 10 a couple years back for fairly cheap. I’ve included a picture for reference, so you can distinguish between the two. Sometimes even scars, if the rope is thin enough and the pressure is applied forcefully enough. I recommend rope of 5 millimeters or above for safety reasons. There are also tips on making uber sexy fun times happen, and real life examples and case studies of rope bondage fuelled awesomeness. Rope Bondage The Smart Way was distilled down from about six years of learning, practicing, and testing, and contains my go-to practices for my own use of rope bondage in BDSM; with both written instructions and LOTS of annotated pictures to make learning it all easy.

That doesn’t mean you can’t do it; it won’t catastrophically weaken your rope, but with successive washes I would start keeping a much closer eye on how much load I put on it. You need to dry it under tension, or it will shrink and thicken unevenly. If I’m not doing shibari, if I’m doing a quick restraint or column tie for sexual or other purposes with no care for the aesthetic, then this is my go to. Smooth, soft, fast, secure. Let’s face it, sometimes the Internet is just more convenient. Next we have a polypropylene webbing.

But every time I’ve used it, whatever I’ve been wearing or my partner has been wearing has wound up dusted in the stuff. It also makes things more likely to be itchy, sneezy, etc. The tighter the lay, the stiffer and more durable the rope tends to be. Tossa is actually a pretty tight lay, which means it needs a bit of extra conditioning or a long period of break in time before it’s really good to tie with, due to that extra stiffness. I found it at a Bunnings Warehouse. It wouldn’t ordinarily have gotten my attention, because it looks fairly obviously too stiff for use as bondage rope. I don’t remember exactly how much I paid in NZD, but it was between $150.00 to $180.00 with shipping included. The second lot of jute I purchased (200 metres, 8 mm) cost a lot more, but I was treating myself to a “savings milestone” so I’m not too upset.

I generally get rope of 5 or 6 millimeters in diameter. Bondage Rope: Types of Rope Used In Bondage. You’re going to need knots, which will take a tiny bit longer. It’s not dyeable; you’re stuck with the colour you buy. It’s very smooth, with almost no tooth, which means a lot less friction, making it a slicker, faster rope. In general, most synthetic ropes are like that, to one level or another.

It also makes things more likely to be itchy, sneezy, etc. Update (2018). Nylon is nicely smooth and comfortable as well, but it has very low tooth, so you need to use surgeon’s knots instead of square knots and any half-hitch style knot should be done three times instead of two. (If you don’t, your partner may be able to manipulate the tie and wriggle out, and rope bottoms kind of hate that. At the moment, my two favourite ropes are the Twisted Monk Hemp for bedroom ties, and Tossa Jute for absolutely everything else. I really value it’s incredibly good performance and aesthetic. When I last used it in a lesson, the model exclaimed over how nice it felt. Again, it comes in different colours. Good flex and texture. It is considerably stronger than the Zen rope I just mentioned; and again, is rated.