Despite all social change, women do the lion’s share of the housework and they also invest twice as many hours in active childcare as their fathers, according to research by the Austrian Institute for Family Research.

Despite all social change, women do the lion’s share of the housework and they also invest twice as many hours in active childcare as their fathers, according to research by the Austrian Institute for Family Research.

Despite all social change, women do the lion’s share of the housework and they also invest twice as many hours in active childcare as their fathers, according to research by the Austrian Institute for Family Research.

“The work of men and women” by Sonja Dörfler and Georg Wernhart lists the weekly effort in your own four walls – in comparison to Austria, France and Sweden. “Swedish men are harder working, including the French. The Austrians are very traditional,” said the scientist.

Active time increases for both men and women

The active time spent with children – studying, doing tasks, playing and other leisure activities – is increasing for men in all countries and also for women (with the exception of Sweden). In Austria there are 2.5 hours per week compared to five of the women, which means that the Alpine republic is either the same or better than the other two countries. The fact that it is still a little “little” is explained by the fact that these evaluations also include women and men without children, which of course reduces the average weekly hours for childcare.

The time use studies were carried out in Austria in 1992 and 2008/09. During this period, the weekly hours for women fell from 34 to 27 hours of housework and childcare, while that for men rose from nine to eleven. Nevertheless, the Alpine republic is still the country with the largest number of hours per week for women (A: 27, F: 26, S: 22 hours per week) and the smallest for men (A: 11, F: 14, S: 17 hours per week).

Household mainly women’s business

Incidentally, there is no greater gender-specific discrepancy in any country than in washing and ironing clothes, which is mainly done by women. The only household chore that men spend more time than women is doing household maintenance and repairs. Swedish and French men spend around four hours a week, Austrian men a little under two hours.

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The

Mother’s Day

is a popular opportunity to thank mums for all their hard work – and rightly so.

Despite all social change, women do the lion’s share of the housework and they also invest twice as many hours in active childcare as their fathers, according to research by the Austrian Institute for Family Research.paperwritings testimonials

“The work of men and women” by Sonja Dörfler and Georg Wernhart lists the weekly effort in your own four walls – in comparison to Austria, France and Sweden. “Swedish men are harder working, including the French. The Austrians are very traditional,” said the scientist.

Active time increases for both men and women

Active time spent with children – studying, doing tasks, playing and other leisure activities – is increasing for men in all countries and for women (with the exception of Sweden) too. In Austria there are 2.5 hours per week compared to five of the women, which means that the Alpine republic is either the same or better than the other two countries. The fact that it is still a little “little” is explained by the fact that these evaluations also include women and men without children, which of course reduces the average weekly hours for childcare.

The time use studies were carried out in Austria in 1992 and 2008/09. During this period, the weekly hours for women fell from 34 to 27 hours of housework and childcare, while that for men rose from nine to eleven. Nevertheless, the Alpine republic is still the country with the largest number of hours per week for women (A: 27, F: 26, S: 22 hours per week) and the smallest for men (A: 11, F: 14, S: 17 hours per week).

Household mainly women’s business

Incidentally, there is no greater gender-specific discrepancy in any country than in washing and ironing clothes, which is mainly done by women. The only household chore that men spend more time than women is doing household maintenance and repairs. Swedish and French men spend around four hours a week, Austrian men a little less than two hours.

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A giant asteroid will fly past Earth on Wednesday morning. The approximately two kilometers wide celestial body “1998 OR2” offers astronomers an extraordinary opportunity to study it in detail with telescopes, announced the US space agency Nasa on Tuesday evening (local time).

The asteroid will therefore be closest to Earth around 05.55 a.m. local time on the US east coast (11.55 a.m. CEST) – and still be very far away: about 6.3 million kilometers or 16 times further away than the moon. So he does not pose a threat to the earth.

Also interesting:

Asteroids – so great is the danger from space

A NASA team discovered the celestial body in July 1998. It belongs to the category of “potentially dangerous asteroids,” according to NASA. Since 1998, his career has always been followed. “As a result (…) we can say with certainty that this asteroid will not come into contact with Earth for the next 200 years.” In the year 2079, “1998 OR2” will come closer to earth than it is now: Then it will only be about four times further away than the moon.

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The

Mother’s Day

is a popular opportunity to thank mommies for all their hard work – and rightly so.

Despite all social change, women do the lion’s share of the housework and they also invest twice as many hours in active childcare as their fathers, according to research by the Austrian Institute for Family Research.

“The work of men and women” by Sonja Dörfler and Georg Wernhart lists the weekly effort in your own four walls – in comparison to Austria, France and Sweden. “Swedish men are harder working, including the French. The Austrians are very traditional,” said the scientist.

Active time increases in both men and women

Active time spent with children – studying, doing tasks, playing and other leisure activities – is increasing for men in all countries and for women (with the exception of Sweden) too. In Austria there are 2.5 hours per week compared to five of the women, which means that the Alpine republic is either the same as or better than the other two countries. The fact that it is still a little “little” is explained by the fact that these evaluations also include women and men without children, which of course reduces the average weekly hours for childcare.

The time use studies were carried out in Austria in 1992 and 2008/09. During this period, the weekly hours for women fell from 34 to 27 hours of housework and childcare, while that for men rose from nine to eleven. Nevertheless, the Alpine republic is still the country with the largest number of hours per week for women (A: 27, F: 26, S: 22 hours per week) and the smallest for men (A: 11, F: 14, S: 17 hours per week).

Household mainly women’s business

Incidentally, there is no greater gender-specific discrepancy in any country than in washing and ironing clothes, which is mainly done by women. The only household chore that men spend more time than women is doing household maintenance and repairs. Swedish and French men spend around four hours a week, Austrian men a little under two hours.

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The

Mother’s Day

is a popular opportunity to thank mommies for all their hard work – and rightly so.

Despite all social change, women do the lion’s share of the housework and they also invest twice as many hours in active childcare as their fathers, according to research by the Austrian Institute for Family Research.

“The work of men and women” by Sonja Dörfler and Georg Wernhart lists the weekly effort in your own four walls – in comparison to Austria, France and Sweden. “Swedish men are harder working, including the French. The Austrians are very traditional,” said the scientist.

Active time increases for both men and women

Active time spent with children – studying, doing tasks, playing and other leisure activities – is increasing for men in all countries and for women (with the exception of Sweden) too. In Austria there are 2.5 hours per week compared to five of the women, which means that the Alpine republic is either the same or better than the other two countries. The fact that it is still a little “little” is explained by the fact that these evaluations also include women and men without children, which of course reduces the average weekly hours for childcare.

The time use studies were carried out in Austria in 1992 and 2008/09. During this period, the weekly hours for women fell from 34 to 27 hours of housework and childcare, while that for men rose from nine to eleven. Nevertheless, the Alpine republic is still the country with the largest number of hours per week for women (A: 27, F: 26, S: 22 hours per week) and the smallest for men (A: 11, F: 14, S: 17 hours per week).

Household mainly women’s business

Incidentally, there is no greater gender-specific discrepancy in any country than in washing and ironing clothes, which is mainly done by women. The only household chore that men spend more time than women is doing household maintenance and repairs. Swedish and French men spend around four hours a week, Austrian men a little under two hours.

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically.

More on this ▶

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Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at)

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8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at)

Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto.at)

In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (Trend.at)

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Comments

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The

Mother’s Day

is a popular opportunity to thank mommies for all their hard work – and rightly so.

Despite all social change, women do the lion’s share of the housework and they also invest twice as many hours in active childcare as their fathers, according to research by the Austrian Institute for Family Research.

“The work of men and women” by Sonja Dörfler and Georg Wernhart lists the weekly effort in your own four walls – in comparison to Austria, France and Sweden. “Swedish men are harder working, including the French. The Austrians are very traditional,” said the scientist.

Active time increases for both men and women

Active time spent with children – studying, doing tasks, playing and other leisure activities – is increasing for men in all countries and for women (with the exception of Sweden) too. In Austria there are 2.5 hours per week compared to five of the women, which means that the Alpine republic is either the same or better than the other two countries. The fact that it is still a little “little” is explained by the fact that these evaluations also include women and men without children, which of course reduces the average weekly hours for childcare.

The time use studies were carried out in Austria in 1992 and 2008/09. During this period, the weekly hours for women fell from 34 to 27 hours of housework and childcare, while that for men rose from nine to eleven. Nevertheless, the Alpine republic is still the country with the largest number of hours per week for women (A: 27, F: 26, S: 22 hours per week) and the smallest for men (A: 11, F: 14, S: 17 hours per week).

Household mainly women’s business

Incidentally, there is no greater gender-specific discrepancy in any country than in washing and ironing clothes, which is mainly done by women.